Things Watching TV and Reading Should Have in Common

Even though watching TV appears to be mindless at times, it really isn’t. There are many skills that we seemingly automatically learn to use that make watching TV an enjoyable pastime. Many of these skills are necessary to also implement into our reading in order for it also to be enjoyable and fully comprehended.

What are these watching TV and reading skills I speak of? They are as follows:

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Fostering Global Citizenship in Our Children

I did not know much about global citizenship growing up. I grew up in a rural area in which pretty much everyone happened to be of the same race and celebrated the same cultural traditions.

As a child, I did not fly on a plane to go on family vacations with my parents and siblings. Since my childhood was also before the internet was a thing, I didn’t know much about other countries unless I heard about them on the news (usually in a negative light), read about them in an encyclopedia or learned about them in school. That was my extent of global citizenship knowledge. I didn’t see myself as being part of anything outside of the community I was growing up in.

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Bad Behavior Does Not Mean Bad Kids

Early on in my pregnancy with my fourth child, I was punched. I turned so I got it in my back instead of the gut that it was going for. Thankfully, everything was okay and it didn’t have a negative impact on my pregnancy. Here’s the thing, though. The 10-year-old that threw the punch truly had no idea that he was punching me. This boy was known for having bad behavior. He was having a moment of rage, ran out of the room he was in, and I was there. It was as if I was a wall or a pillow. Afterward, he had no recollection of it happening.

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Must-Have Grammar and Spell Checker Software

Anyone who writes can benefit from grammar and spell checker software. This is true whether writing is painful or is something that comes easily. In this post, I share my favorite grammar checking software tools. Each will work to support not only the polished writer but also those individuals with a writing disability.

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The Value of a Parent’s Self-Care

I haven’t been so great at self-care or making myself a priority for most of my adult life. In fact, up until the past year and a bit, I viewed people (especially parents) that regularly took time for themselves as selfish.

I grew up with hard work being valued… valued beyond health and happiness. Don’t feel well? Nothing that requires a day off! People need to work. No time to stop and take care of ourselves. Feeling miserable? Grin and bear it! There is work to do… there is always work to do!

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Gratitude for Safety and Freedom

You know how you have moments that, when you look back, you have sincere gratitude for them? I am extremely grateful that, years ago, I came across and purchased 2 copies of Grandmother: A Record Book of Memories by Linda Spivey. Even more so, I am grateful that I had the questions in the book answered by my paternal grandmother and my mother before it was too late. It is through my copies of these books that I am now able to easily look up much of my family history.

It’s Thanksgiving weekend here in Canada. I live in Canada thanks to having grandparents that immigrated here. It is with gratitude that I share their stories and more in this post.

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Supporting Children in Working Through and Preventing Meltdowns

I’m about to share something that I am not proud of. As an adult, I have had occasional meltdowns. You maybe know the kind? I’ve yelled and screamed… even thrown the odd thing. Afterward, I pretty much always feel crappy and rarely, if ever, do I believe that my response was appropriate to whatever happened leading up to my angry response.

angry brown monkey

I don’t believe I’m alone. Meltdowns look different from person to person. Let’s consider for a moment a few of the responses that have become acceptable for an adult when feeling this way and/or what adults refer to as “having a bad day”:

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Creating Voice to Text and Audio Files in Microsoft OneNote

Last week, I wrote about how Microsoft OneNote can be used as a reader for individuals. You can check that post out here. This week, I will go over how to use both Voice to Text and audio recordings in Microsoft OneNote as well as how to share an assignment done / saved in OneNote with another. Voice to Text can really help individuals to get their thoughts down without being bogged down simply trying to figure out how to write each word on paper.

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Using Immersive Reader in Microsoft OneNote

I was blessed to attend an EdTech Summit recently. While there, I was enlightened to learn of more ways that technology can be used to support individuals who struggle with reading and writing. One of my new favorite tools is Microsoft OneNote. Microsoft OneNote is absolutely free in both the Apple app and Android play stores. It can also be used for free on a laptop.

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